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international airport. the shooting involved a u.s. military shuttle bus. someone got on the bus and started shooting. two are confirmed dead. we believe they're two u.s. soldiers. one person has been taken into custody. again we know two are killed. it is reported that those are two u.s. soldiers. the incident is over, the airport is operating as usual. this is out of frankfurt. as soon as we get more detail, we get to fred out of berlin. >>> the u.s. supreme court is reaffirming the first amendment right to free speech even if it is painful and ugly. in an 8-1 decision, they say a kansas church can push their message outside military funle rals. jeffrey toobin is on the phone with us. jeff, let's start off here, is this a surprise to you the court's decision? because this is a case that everybody's been watching. >> reporter: it's a pain until awful case and the westboro baptist church is an insuggelt religion everywhere. but the decision is not a surprise. these statements in this context, nondisruptive statements about politics, are at the heart of what the first amendment is all about e
of the globe and japan and the u.s. it would follow a little possible parcel of radiation all the way across the country and pacific. it would take many days. a lot of the radiation would be gone. there's just no threat. >> we will see. you'll keep watching, it as will i, but thanks so much for watching it here. want to turn things over to jessica yellin in "the situation room." jess, to you. >> happening now, breaking news. three nuclear reactors damaged to the core. the crisis in japan is said to be deteriorating right now. u.s. officials are suggesting the situation is more dire than many thought. with america's top nuclear watchdogs saying radiation levels are extremely high. freezing cold and snow adding to the hardship for quake and tsunami survivors there and hampering the rescue and recovery. more people now seem eager to get out of japan all together. >>> and wolf blitzer's one-on-one interview with secretary of state hillary clinton in egypt. she's talking about the disaster in japan, as well as the uprisings in libya and across the region. welcome to our viewers in the united stat
are found in tokyo's water supply, as the u.s. bans the import of some japanese foods. >> right there. right there! >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a monster of the deep. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. we will not surrender. those words, the defiant libyan leader moammar gadhafi, who made his first public appearance in a week. despite the allied-imposed no-fly zone, libyan troops continued their unrelenting attacks against rebel-held cities where conditions are described as desperate. the u.s. military says it is considering all options. explosions were heard in tripoli this morning. and susan mcginnis is in washington with more on this story. good morning, susan. >> hi, good morning, betty. the mission in libya is accomplishing its goal, including grounding gadhafi's air force. but as criticism of the operation grows, along with the cost, the u.s. is looking to hand off control. despite a fourth night of allied air strikes pounding libya, leader
to building more nuclear power plants in the u.s. that is up from last year. >>> and now, it is just about that time to head it to the man, the birthday man today, wolf blitzer in "the situation room." wolf, to you. >>> thanks very much, brooke. happening now, two u.s. air force crew members make it out of a fighter jet crash in libya alive. we are taking you to the crash site and telling you how libyan rebels help keep one of them safe. >>> also, president obama is facing growing anger for ordering air strikes in libya without the approval of congress. now, one fellow democrat, even talking about possible impeachment. >>> and new u.s. assessments of the radiation risks from japan's nuclear crisis and new progress inside the plant to shed light on the damage from the sudan. i'm wolf blitzer. you are in "the situation room." >>> some very anxious hours for the u.s. military after the crash of a fighter jet, giving way to relief now that the two crew members are safely out of libya. defense officials confirming that both the pilot and the weapons officer have been rescued. they say the f-15
, if you are just waking up. fresh word from the nation's top military officer after u.s. and coalition forces bombarded libya's defenses overnight. admiral mike mullen tells nbc news there is a no-fly zone in place in libya. that's after more than 110 tomahawk cruise missiles from warships and submarines slammed the antiaircraft units and command posts. admiral mullen also said that possible outcome of the military action could include the embattled leader, moammar gadhafi, remaining in power. meanwhile, gadhafi issued an audio address on state tv, saying the country was preparing for a long war. on the screen, the image of a giant, gold fist crushing an american plane. nbc's jim maceda's in libya's capital of tripoli. jim, with another good day to you, we have cruise missiles that were targeting sites around the city there. what's it like there now? >> reporter: here, it's quiet. it wasn't so at 2:30, 3:00 in the morning, though, alex. we all jumped and jolted first when we heard a number of explosions. it was these deep thuds that you never like to hear. they could have been cruise m
have been discontinued. japanese officials said today they are asking the u.s. government for help. charlie d'agata is in niigata, japan, with more. good morning, charlie. >> reporter: good morning to you, betty. nobody is watching the events unfolding at the nuclear power plant more closely than the people here. many who were evacuated from the region around that plant and wonder if they'll ever be able to go home. fire trucks resumed blasting water onto japan's crippled nuclear power plant as crews raced to restore power to the facility. as early as today, they hope to feed electricity to at least two of the six overheated reactors, and get crucial water pumps working again. >> if the cooling systems in the reactors and fuel pumps are basically sound, and then the power comes on, then we might look at that moment as the beginning of the end of this crisis. >> reporter: but even if the power starts back up, it's not clear the water pumps will. they may have already suffered too much damage. there are also fears that getting power back online could spark another explosion. smoke bi
back over to candy crowley. >>> this morning u.s. and international forces have effectively put in place the no-fly zone in libya. that was preceded by a furious assault of tomahawk missiles from allied forces at sea. >> this is just the first phase of a multiphased military operation to enforce the united nations resolution and deny the regime to use force against its own people. >> the days of tough talk are over. today the attack on libya. the role of the u.s. military command commander, the latest from mike mule enof centcom commander admiral william fallon. >> what we really know from energy secretary stephen chu. i'm candy crowley. and this is "state of the union." moammar gadhafi's bases are getting pounded. he remains defiant. there was this broadcast message. >> they have to know we will fight. >> this land will not submit ever. we have defeated italy when it was great power like you today. you are aggressives. you are animals. >> let's go to senior international correspondent nic robertson. he is in tripoli. nic, what have you seen or heard of this first 24 hours reall
several homes. no injuries were reported there, th. >>> kewhere the coast.ips are patrolling off u.s.fficials say theibyan air force is nlonger a factor. mewhile, libyan ground forces still trying to retake rebel-held posions are being attacked by alliplaned war.rrl . >> reporter: traces of anti-acrt fire pierce the night sky tripo. the eastern part of thcapital. there's alsoord that clition forceshit have ammar gadhafi's command in ajdabiya. rebels moving up their front line are confident they'll soon be able to te that city. >> this is a matteof time. time only. aftemaybe one day or less than one day, these tanks wil surrender. >> reporter: clition planes so bombegadhafs forces in misrata, to stop them from shling civilians. secretary of state hilry clinton says coladhafi h the power to stop all of this. >> the quickest way for him to end is is to actually serve thliby people by leaving. repeatedly sted gadhafi must go. but the u.n. rolution lls foprection of the byan peoplenot a regime change. that leaves pridt obama to answ some tough estions. house speaker john boehner sen the
tomahawk cruise missiles fired from u.s. british ships and sur marines strapped to other defense facilities ashore. >> i tried to run up to the roof and then i saw the second explosion, i saw a huge fire coming up from that place. and there was a lot of noise kind hear some shooting. i can't determine whether it is an anti-craft shooting or gunfire shooting, it was very severe, very heavy. >>> i'm fredricka whitfield in atlanta. >> i'm michael holmes welcoming viewers to the special coverage in libya. >> anti-aircraft gunfire and explosions can be heard this hour in the libyan capital of tripoli. still unclear if that gunfire is in response to new air and missile strikes from coalition forces. cnn's nic robertson who is in tripoli, says smoke can be seen rising from the presidential compound. >> american, french and british military forces began these air strikes on saturday the mission is being dubbed operation odyssey dawn, a u.n.-approved operation, intended to stop the libyan leader, moammar gadhafi, from violating a cease-fire and i tacking his own people. >> multiple air and missile s
>>> i want to on "nightline" another war? the breaking plus. u.s. and allies prepare to intervene in the bloody war in libya after the u.n. authorizes military action against gadhafi's forces. >> and in a worldwide exclusive, gadhafi's sons talk from tripoli tonight. >>> plus, nuclear code red. we have the latest on the desperate efforts of the japanese to stop the deadly chain of events from turning into a all-out nuclear catastrophe. are they at the point of no return? >>> and the inconvenient truth. the race to cool a stockpile of radioactive fuel rods getting dangerously hot and what scientists fear if that race is lost. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good evening. i'm cynthia mcfadden. we begin in libya where the u.s. and its allies appear poised to take military action on the heels of a u.n. resolution earlier this evening imposing a no-fly zone over the country and authorizing quote, all necessary measures to protect civilians. hours earlier, libya -- we spoke to gadhafi's son. christiane joins me now. you were just in libya, what can you tell us? >> well, i think they
of circumstances and an entirely different mission which is not the u.s. military mission at this point. but clearly it is a political mission for the white house and many of the united states military diplomatic allies there in europe. >> jim, thanks. >> you bet. >> i want to talk more about that coalition. the military muscles has put moammar gadhafi air defenses. these attacks reach the door step, striking the administration building but the location is currently unknown. jim maceda has the latest from tripoli for us. have there been air strikes? >> no, there haven't been, thomas. we have some news, however, of this ongoing development in the third largest city. it is gadhafi forces which were hit by the air strikes, by the way, outside yesterday. today they are on the attack with reports that gadhafi troops now with tanks and snipers have entered the city and fired on people killing the latest figure is at least nine individuals. now this is extremely interesting because you've got troops who allegedly have changed out of their uniforms into street clothes looking like either armed
-made guns across the border and for the unrelenting demand of illegal drugs in the u.s. the two countries are also at odds after a wikileaks release quoting u.s. officials quoting mexican's security agencies "corrupt and dysfunctional." publicly, the obama administration is putting a positive spin on the relationship. >> there exists an unprecedented level of cooperation between the u.s. and mexico. >> but when the two presidents go behind bars, tensions could rise over a recent interview in which president calderon called u.s. law enforcement agencies disorganized. and there will also be discussions about the growing number of americans caught in the cross fire of mexico's drug war, including u.s. immigration agent, jaime spatta, who was killed in an ambush along a highway 16 days ago. at his funeral last week, homeland department secretary, janet napolitano, promised to seek justice. >> we will not relent or let up or flinch in any way in our determination to see that those responsible for his death are held to account for their crimes. >> mexico is the u.s.'s largest trade partner, and
to threaten people there. the japanese government has reached out to the u.s. for nuclear advice. so, eight more experts from the nuclear regulatory commission are now on their way to japan to try to help. rob and peggy? >> emily schmidt, thank you for that report. >>> and japanese officials dealing with the nuclear crisis are, quote, freaked out. that's according to one u.s. counterpart. >> that's putting it mildly. abc's akiko fujita joins us from narita, japan. so, how are the japanese people dealing with news of the leak? >> reporter: what we're seeing out in the stores is any indication, not dealing with it very well. we've heard of panic buying, even in tokyo, which you just heard is 170 miles south of the reactor. we have heard reports of stores being sold out of radios, flashlights, candles, fuel cans. essentially any emergency materials. we've also heard of grocery stores, their shelves being cleared. keep in mind that food and water was already in short supply immediately after the quake hit. people went out to the stores to stock up. now, with reports of the explosion today, peop
the japanese government has reached out to the iaea, the international atomic agency and the u.s. determined here in a desperate race to avoid a catastrophic meltdown. entire families escaped the shadow of the doomed nuclear power reactors are coming here worried they were exposed to radiation. we were given extraordinary access to the test sites where medical teams used megaphones to direct the parents and children where to go. they're using geiggar counters and hand held scanners checking everyone one by one especially the most vulnerable, the children scanning this little girl's hair and there are countless faces here. there are three nuclear reactors at what is called the fukushima daiichi plant. just two days ago an explosion at reactor one released radioactive material into the air and yesterday a second blast at three releasing more and while dramatic these are not the worst case scenarios. tonight there is growing concern over reactor number two becoming dangerously overheated. inside each of those buildings it's a fiery hot nuclear core. inside a small structure. cool water must be
. america and its allies now just hours away from control of the skies. so what's next for u.s. forces, and what will gadhafi do now? >>> radiation in food from japan. >> fukushima fresh vegetables. >> we do our own tests. >>> and an american family after ten days of hope learns their daughter was lost trying to save others. >>> men, women and jobs. which sex is getting 90% of the new jobs and why? >>> and sibling secrets. are you an older or younger sibling? news about which order gives you an edge in health and happiness. >>> good evening. as we come on the air tonight beginning this week together, the united states is still in the middle of an international assault on moammar gadhafi's libya. but the battle is moving at breakneck speed. it is called "operation odyssey dawn," and as of tonight, the skies are clear. gadhafi's forces have come to a halt though there are still big questions. how soon can the u.s. hand over the lead to other countries? who are these libyan rebels, and are we even on the same side? and what is next? will gadhafi fold, or could this go on for years? we hav
in the u.s. america gets about 20% of its electricity from nuclear power. but the president says all energy sources have their down sides. >> nothing's completely failsafe. nothing's completely foolproof. and so, each time these kinds of events happen, i think it's very important for us to examine how we can further improve the safety and performance of these plants. >> president obama says he's been assured that hawaii and the u.s. mainland will not be affected by radiation from the japanese disaster. >>> so, what is the actual risk from the radiation leak in japan? dr. jon lapook has that part of the story. >> reporter: when radiation began leaking from the stricken power plant, the fallout was felt more than 5,000 miles away. at this pharmacy near los angeles. all sold out of potassium iodide. >> there's people that are really worried they're going from store to store. >> reporter: the pills can prevent the thyroid from developing cancer caused by radiation. but are they really necessary here? >> i think that's extremely unlikely that there will be any risk to folks in this country. i me
>>> rebel retreat. libyan troops have opposition forces on the run. but for how long? as the u.s. considers arming the insurgency. >>> cajun cleanup. a powerful storm rolls through louisiana, threatening the southeast with flooding and high winds. >>> and union fight. ohio can vote on limiting collective bargaining rights, as the battle in wisconsin goes to collective bargaining rights, as the battle in wisconsin goes to court. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. this morning, the back and forth fighting in libya has turned against the rebel troops. opposition forces are on the run, fleeing the latest government counterattack. the rebels were trying to advance on moammar gadhafi's hometown of sirte. they've also had to leave two critical oil ports, brega and ras lanuf. the u.s. navy launched a new barrage of cruise missiles at targets near tripoli and nato takes command of the operation today. joel brown is in washington with more. good morning, joel. what's the latest? >> betty, it wasn't even a close fight. gadhafi forc
leader's compound overnight. u.s. firepower on display. but for how much longer? >>> radiation risk. spreading now to food and water. but at the devastated plant, some improvements to report today. >>> and the megamerger, set to affect millions of cell phone users. what would an at&t takeover of t-mobile mean for your monthly bill? >>> and good morning, everyone. thanks for being with us today. the u.s.-led coalition is not quite ready to say mission accomplished this morning, even after a weekend of pounding attacks that virtually crippled libya's defenses. >> allied leaders insist gadhafi is not the target of the assault. but a cruise missile did plow into a buildening on his residential compound. >> after that all, what is next? emily schmidt joins us with the latest. good morning, emily. >> reporter: good morning to you. u.s. war planes led most of the assault on libya over the weekend, including 90 tons of bombs dropped by b-2 bombers that were flown in from missouri. but the pentagon says it expects to hand over control of the operation to allies in a matter of days. libya's m
by the president where u.s. military participation here would end. >>> plus, a troubling turn in japan. workers are pulled from the crippled reactor complex after smoke is seen rising from two of the reactors overnight. how big a setback is this? >>> it's monday, march 21st, 2011. i'm willie geist. chuck and savannah are traveling with the president in south america. we will hear from them later this hour. >>> let's get right to the run down, we begin with operation odyssey dawn in libya. punishing air strikes drove pro-gadhafi forces further from home base last night though it is unclear where gadhafi is at this hour. rebels celebrated after u.s., british and french planes demolished libyan tanks and took out air defenses. overnight the opposition said it had regained almost 40 miles of territory. colonel gadhafi appears to have escaped harm in the attack on his administration building. he has though warned of a long war and said he'd open up the government's arsenal to arm his supporters. >>> on sunday defense secretary robert gates reiterated that the u.s. has no plans to send in ground forc
. still, u.s. warships and planes helping with relief efforts temporarily moved away from the area as a precaution. crews have been desperately trying to avoid a nuclear meltdown at the facility since it was damaged in friday's powerful earthquake. over the weekend they dumped sea water into the reactors to try to cool them down. more than 180,000 residents were also evacuated, and had to be scanned for radiation before entering shelters. across the northeast coast, more than 10,000 people are believed to be dead from the magnitude 9 quake, and tsunami. dramatic new video captured violent waves that slammed ashore, wiping out entire villages. since the massive earthquake three days ago, aftershocks continue to rattle the region. an average of 12 to 15 per hour. some more than 6.0 in magnitude. but there are stories of survival. crews rescued this 60-year-old man who was clinging to what was left of his roof. this man also made it out alive. i thought i was dying when i was pushed into the water, he says. but with thoughts of my family i decided to make every effort to survive. but
clear that no u.s. boots will be on the ground in libya but how long air strikes by u.s. pilots will continue is on everyone's mind right now. those strikes, which include six more tomahawk missile strike have led to a rapid sweep of forces east to west. in the past 49 hours, rebels from taken key towns and striking at sirte, as we speak, the hometown of moammar gadhafi. nbc's chuck todd live at white house here. some of the president's critic says he should have given the speech that we're expecting tonight before the strikes began. >> reporter: well, look, there was even some debate among some supporters of the president on that very notion. but that's -- that's not going to happen. you can't turn back the clock. so the decision was made. they would wait until there was -- they were done with the u.s. portion of this. and so, it's not a mere coincidence that when the handover to nato to run this no-fly zone is taking place, that the president is going to use the occasion to both make the case for why he made this decision, number one, and number two, it's going to be valedicto
shattered by a new round of gunfire that follows a weekend of u.s. led air strikes. president obama answering questions this afternoon for the first time since sending our fighter jets into action. >> the core principle that has to be upheld here is that when the entire international community, almost unanimously, says that there is a potential humanitarian crisis about to take place that a leader who has lost his legitimacy decides to turn his military on his own people, that we can't simply stand by with empty words. >> one of this weekend's bombings badly damaged president gadhafi's compound. pro-gadhafi forces opened fire on a crowd of rebels in mizratah today killing nine of them gaining control of that area seen as critical for gadhafi on a strategic level. what is happening in libya? the latest headline from the uprisingings throughout the middle east look like this away from libya. yemen also in crisis right now. the president is losing his grip on power. he dissolved his cabinet over the weekend but for the growing groups of protesters that's not enough. some of the members
, the u.s. military confirms an f-15 fighter jet has crashed in libya, but the pentagon says it was not shot down. we'll have the latest on the fate of the crew. >> plus. >> let me emphasize that this operation will take place in a matter of days, not a matter of weeks. >> it's still unclear who will take charge. in japan, set back and progress, as the crippled reactor's spent fuel rods -- officials say they can't turn on the juice just yet. it's tuesday march 22, i'm willie geist. also this morning with the first republican debate, a little over a month away, if you can believe it, finally at least one major gop candidate looks ready to run. let's get to the rundown. >>> we begin in libya where a united states f-15 fighter jet crashed today while carrying out its mission in benghazi. >> u.s. military officials tell nbc news that two crewmembers have indeed been rescued from the ground there in libya and are safely on their way to europe. the two crewmember in their f-15 eagle were on a routine mission enforcing that no fly zone east of benghazi when the fighter jet experienc
? what role will the u.s. play? and did the u.n. vote come too late to stop gadhafi? will gadhafi fight for the death or accept some kind of deal. answer those questions as we prepare to fight in a third muslim country. and japanese authorities have raised the assessment of a nuclear disaster to a five -- that's three mile island level on a seven-point scale and they now more or less at mitt they're overwhelmed. they're employing a throw against the wall and see what sticks approach in the nuclear commission. it says it can take weeks to get this thing under control. score one for the unions in wisconsin. the judge has temporarily blocked the new law shrinking collective bargaining rights in that state. wow, democrats hope this is the first of many obstacles. republicans say, it's just a speed bump, check it out. let me finish with libya. we know how we're getting in. but do you have any idea how we're going to get out? we start on libya. richard engle is joining us from cairo. thank you, richard, give us a sense of what's happening as the u.n. begins to take action. what is the conditi
>> couric: tonight, the u.s. uses a warplane as the allies keep up the assault on libya and qaddafi remains defiant. >> (translated): we win. we will be victorious in this historical battle. we will not surrender. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, they survived one disaster, now these japanese have been forced to take shelter against another threat-- nuclear radiation. america's nuclear problem. where to store permanently more than 145 million pounds of spent fuel rods. and college students struggling to make the grade. what some schools are doing to make sure they graduate. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it's four days into a u.s.-led assault on his military, and libya's moammar qaddafi has lost radar installations, tanks, and naval facilities but not his defiance. he appeared in public tonight in tripoli vowing to fight on and telling supporters he will win and will not surrendered. qaddafi's forces kept up their attacks on civilians today in a n
>>> tonight on "nightline," another war? breaking news. the u.s. and its allies prepare to intervene in the bloody war in libya, after the u.n. authorizing military action against colonel gadhafi's forces. and, in a worldwide exclusive, gadhafi's son saif talks from tripoli tonight to christiane amanpour. >>> plus, nuclear code red. we have the latest on the desperate efforts of the japanese to stop a deadly chain of events from turning into an all-out nuclear catastrophe. are they at the point of no return? >>> and, theinconvenient truth. the race to cool the fuel rods getting dangerously hot. and what scientists fear can happen if that race is lost. >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadenden and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," march 17th, 2011. >> good evening, i'm cynthia mcfadden. we begin tonight in libya, where the u.s. and its allies appear poised to take military action on the heels of a u.n. resolution earlier this evening, imposing a no-fly zone over the country and authorizing, quote, all necessar
in the opening minutes of the day as the u.s. stock market reacts to the nuclear crisis. >>> i'm tamron hall. the "news nation" is following the latest on the nuclear emergency in japan where it is 3:00 a.m. local time. threat level is now being called a six out of seven by the french authority of nuclear safety. a watchdog group that monitors radiation safety. chernobyl, for some perspective here, was six out of serve. three mile island was rated a five. latest explosion in unit two of the fukushima plant may be the worst yet. international atomic energy agency says there's evidence it breached the primary containment shell. that means more radiation could be leaking from that unit. the iaea says radiation levels at site have been decreasing. people living within 20 kilometers of the plant have been evacuated and are lining up to be scanned for radiation. a no-fly zone has been established around the crippled nuclear plant for 30 kilometers. global economic fears, the stock market plummeted today because of the nuclear concerns and right now the dow, let's take a look at it, is down 178 poi
of the union with candy crowley" starts right now. >>> why in the world is the u.s. military involved in libya? republicans are the toughest critics. there are echos inside the democratic party. >> i really don't believe that we have an obligation to get involved in every single occurrence in that part of the world. >> the immediate thing congress needs to do when it returns is to cut off any funds for containing libya. >> in a statement senator j. rockefeller wrote of serious concerns. our military and budget are stretched thin fighting two wars already. and i want to avoid getting into another conflict with unknown cost and consequences. tomorrow night, the president addresses the nation. today, a muddled mission against gadhafi. we talked to armed services carl levin and chaos throughout the mideast with former national security adviser stephen hadley and the former head of the cia, general michael hayden. and then assessing growing concern over japan's nuclear disaster with nuclear analyst joseph sorincioni and the impact on this with economist alice rivlin and douglas holtz aiken. i'm can
and washington next. good morning. i'm alex witt. thank you for watching us this morning. >>> the u.s. military is calling an overnate aerial bombardment a success. admiral mike mullen says there is effect tiff a no-fly zone in place in libya after 110 cruise missiles slammed anti-aircraft units and command posts. russia says the strikes are killing civilians. and embattled leader moammar gadhafi had a audio address, saying libya was arming its citizens to fight bank. >>> jim , let's get the latest n how things are on the ground there? what are you seeing? >> good morning, alex. as mill tier experts assess just how much -- he's made it quite clear that he's going nowhere. u.s. cruise missiles fire toward the mediterranean coast "operation odyssey dawn" was under way. the targets sophisticated systems that could knock out planes enforcing a no-fly zone. according to the pentagon, at least 20 such sites were hit, many near the capital of tripoli. where tracer and anti-aircraft fire sprayed the night skies defending against the sounds of planes and explosions. by daylight, tripoli was calm, but li
's very important to understand what general madis said today. what he said, that is if the u.s. decided to enforce a no-fly zone it would, first, involve u.s. military air strikes against targets inside libya. you'd have to bomb the runways. you might take out their aircraft or certainly their air defense systems, missiles, radar, and the like. so it would involve a u.s. military attack on libya itself. and if the white house makes that decision, of course, the u.s. military would carry it out. but i can tell you that there's a lot of hesitation, not only here in the building and among the u.s. military to take that kind of aggressive step, but even among the nato allies who would be essential if the u.s. and nato allies were to launch any kind of operation like this, and so far only the british are doing any kind of saber rattling in that regard. and the rest of nato nations, allies, are pretty much silent whether to launch any military operation against libya. >> give is insight on the three military war ships in the suez canal. what is their role, at this point? >> reporter: their ro
. >>> in chile, president obama tried to clarify. >> it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. >> senators on both sides of the aisle are concerned about the end game. >> if we are going into a war with libya, we should declare war on libya. we should pull together with our allies and try to figure out a plan of how that war is to be won. >> we do not have a clear diplomatic policy or a clear statement of foreign policy that is accompanying this military operation. >> there is a growing rift in the coalition over who should be in control. >> no apparent cooperation. some people want to turn it over to nato, the maiamericans and t brits. >> french president ruffled feathers by announcing publicly that french fighters were in the air before his international counterparts were briefed. whoever is in control, arizona republican senator john mccain says, there is only one way to end it. >> a stalemate is a very, very badout come. american policy is that gadhafi must go. >>> a naval facility was hit overnight east of tripoli. robert gates is in moscow. gates says gadhafi is misleading the russia
announced that the four-day air assault in libya will soon achieve its objectives and the u.s. will handoff control of the operation within days. >> what are we attempting to >> what are we attempting to accomplish? >> extend the no-fly zone west towards tripoli. >> what are we attempting to accomplish. >> first comes the war, now the debate. what's the mission in libya? >> you understand there is still not a sufficient no-fly zone. >> the president couldn't say yet. still going to hand it off in days, didn't say who's going to be in charge. >> our jets are taking sides in a civil war. >> we kill his soldiers, we attack his compound, and apparently attempt to kill him. >> the obama administration's reason? pick fne. >> gadhafi needs to go. >> u.s. policy regime check. >> there hasn't been any disagreement that i'm aware of in terms of the mission. >> president obama says that the engagement in libya will be brief. >> one of our biggest concerns is libya descending into chaos and becoming a giant somalia. >> the president takes heat from all sides. >> tough questions from both parties in con
will lead the operation when the u.s. steps back in the days ahead, though nato is expected to play a major role. meanwhile, a u.s. air force fighter jet crashed today in eastern libya. the two men on board ejected and were rescued. a cbs news poll out tonight finds most americans are following the events in libya closely and nearly seven out of ten approve of the air strikes. mandy clark begins our coverage from the scene of that fighter jet crash. >> reporter: this is all that remains of the american f-15e that went down last night. a steady stream of people came to have a look. saleh saeed saleh, a local farmer, was eager to show us the wreckage. when it it this ground he says it sounded like a rocket exploding. he thought qaddafi's forces were on the attack. officials say the fighter jet crashed because of a mechanical error rather than any enemy fire. it landed east of benghazi which is in the heart of rebel territory. the jet's crew ejected safely. were they okay? were they injured? "the person i saw had minor injuries, just scratches" he says. one of the americans landed in a nearby
forces today, and the regime is offering a reward, almost half a million u.s., for the capture of a top opposition figure. we have new cnn video coming in from ras lanuf where rebels with fighting to hold their ground. government troops are using planes and heavy artillery to try to retake the eastern oil city. in the western city of zawiya, libyan television showed government supporters cheering in the streets today, but there are now unconfirmed reports that rebels have retaken the main square there. after days of heavy fighting, it's almost impossible to get through to anyone in zawiya for any independent confirmation of what's going on there. today gadhafi is also sending a new warning to the united states and its allies as they consider imposing a no-fly zone over libya. he promises that all libyans will fight back against what he calls an act of aggression and an attempt to control libya's oil. >> translator: it will be clear aggression. it will also be clear that the intentions are to control libya's oil, choke libya's liberty, land and people. all of the libyans carry weapons so
that will include a discussion of when the u.s. will hand over its lead role. french military officials say french pilot fired a missile at a libyan plane that just landed at a base in the coastal city of misrata. french jets, including some from the aircraft carrier charles de gaulle, seen here off libya, struck a libyan base 150 miles south of the coast. attacks in tripoli targeted a libyan military base depot. libyan state tv broadcast these images of the damage. and the african-american union has invited representatives from gadhafi's government and opposition representatives to talk in ethiopia's capital tomorrow. so far new york response from either side in libya. >>> we begin coverage with nbc news pentagon correspondent, jim miklaszewski. mik, what can you tell us about the incident involving that french fighter jet? >> reporter: u.s. military officials can't tell us very much. earlier today, members of that coalition on the american side said they had no evidence that there was a plane in the air or of any poe sentential shoot-dow. as we find out from the french, one of their war fighting
nuke chenuclear plantse availablize ie izstabilizing. >>> we begin in libya. u.s. says coalition air strikes have established a no fly zone in the east soon to be extendeded to tripoli. richard engel, they say the operation went as well as could be expected. but there are a lot of questions remaining about whether we'll be able to turn this command over to whom and the opposition. how much do we though about the opposition in wlib qua and how do you distinguish between rebel forces and civilians? >> reporter: it's difficult to distinguish from rebel forces and civilians because the rebels until a few days ago or a few weeks ago were mostly civilians and they don't have a cheer leadership, they don't have uniforms. they don't have marked vehicles. and a lot of them are very undisciplined and up frofrnfo l unprofessional. they were trying to see how extensive the air and missile strikes were yesterday. today we were just out with rebel, watching them get into pickup trucks and head toward the front lines. we were watching rebels head to an area where they believe they have liberated m
is at the white house. jim, let's begin with you in the pentagon now. what is the u.s. military saying about the report that a french jet attacked and destroyed a libyan aircraft? >> well, there were all sorts of conflicting reports from the beginning after a french pilot radioed in to the command aboard the mt. whitney, the u.s. command ship out there in the mediterranean that he had shot down a libyan war plane. at the time, u.s. officials said they could not confirm it and continued to check, but subsequently, it turns out, and again, these are still conflicting reports, that apparently this french pilot shot a libyan airplane of some kind, whether it was a war plenty, whether it was a air,r enivia ple,has tve e, it landed at misratah or was already on the ground. now, of course, what made the first reports very significant is that would have been the first libyan aircraft, military, that would have challenged this no-fly zone. because not a single helicopter or libyan war plane has been in the sky since the u.s. and coalition war planes started to enforce that no-fly zone. but also, beca
. >>> straining relations slightly. the u.s. government tells americans in japan to move back from their reactor four times further than what the japanese government is advising its own population. >>> meanwhile, in the middle east, on libyan tv just reported that gadhafi's punishing offensive has reached the outskirts of bengahzi. today the united nation votes on a no-fly zone and a broader range of options including possible air strikes. our guest this morning general wesley clark. >>> i'm chuck todd, savannah is on assignment. happy st. patrick's day. speaking out about his unwavering support of nuclear power. >>> president obama is under fire for sticking to his schedule and policies in the face of alarming world events. is he showinged amirable discipline or looking like a failure of leadership? let's get to the rundown and start in japan. we begin with the death toll from last week's earth earthquake and tsunami is now stands at 5,429. nearly 10,000 are missing. president obama last night spoke to the japanese prime minister to express his condolences and getten ean update on the nucle cr
. the u.s. military is sending a nine-member team to japan, as early as today, to help evacuate -- to evaluate the nuclear situation. it's not clear if they will go to the plant that's been damaged. president obama is due to make a statement at 3:30 eastern time. joining me now is a physicist who has worked on nuclear reactor accident simulations. thank you for joining us. >> nice to be here. >> let's talk about this breaking news at this power cable may be down very soon and this could finally provide some power to unit number three. one of those -- unit number two, excuse me. one of those units affected in this crisis. >> i think that's an extremely good news. if a.c. power had been restored within, you know, a day, we wouldn't have had any of the problems we're dealing with right now. it's too bad it's taken six days, going on seven, to get power there. but restoration of a.c. power will make a huge difference, especially at the three nuclear reactors. >> one of your concerns is that we're seeing trouble with three reactors and them having the problem at the same time there.
from yamagata air base where u.s. smirlt officers are in discussion about aid for survivors of the disaster. this could become a forward operating base for a major u.s. marine operation. we witnessed a navy c-130 transport aircraft fly in earlier. a heavy lift aircraft capable of carrying all manner of aid or equipment. hundreds of thousands of people have been forced from their homes along the northeast coast. the u.s. has already conducted helicopter missions along that battered coastline. and found isolated communities of survivors. >> we found essentially hundreds of people. 100 at this place, 200 at this place, 300 at this place. it's just a matter of getting them out. just like you see anywhere, they don't want to leave their home and family. >> it sounds like a lot of people, we're finding a lot of different groups. the japanese have been very well organized. a lot of firefighters, military helping people out. >> they need water, they need medicine, blankets. the practical stuff. is that what you're finding? >> yes, sir. >> the message from the u.s. side is that they
off. so we continue to have a very desperate situation there and those u.s. officials coming in to try to help to see what they can do. meantime, the humanitarian crisis is widening. it is another very cold night here in japan. the snows were very heavy around the most seriously affected areas. so you have all the people without heat, without electricity. food and water supplies remain very low as do gas supplies. it is tough for people to get around, although they did have some buses of people, evacuees they were able to take out of the immediate area. and they're continuing to test people, including babies for radiation contamination. but red cross workers, other international aid organizations, they're being very cautious right now. they have actually pulled back a little farther away from the nuclear plant. obviously they want to protect the health and safety of their workers as they try to deal with this humanitarian crisis. thomas? >> chris jansing in tokyo for us. chris, thanks so much. >>> the radiation released from nuclear power plants raises concerns about whether wind condi
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